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dc.contributor.authorWillis, Jesse R.
dc.contributor.authorSaus, Ester
dc.contributor.authorIraola Guzmán, Susana
dc.contributor.authorKsiezopolska, Ewa
dc.contributor.authorCozzuto, Luca
dc.contributor.authorGabaldón, Toni
dc.contributor.otherBarcelona Supercomputing Center
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-01T16:24:57Z
dc.date.available2022-09-01T16:24:57Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationWillis, J.R. [et al.]. Citizen-science reveals changes in the oral microbiome in Spain through age and lifestyle factors. "npj Biofilms and Microbiomes", 2022, vol. 8, 38.
dc.identifier.issn2055-5008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/372211
dc.description.abstractThe relevance of the human oral microbiome to our understanding of human health has grown in recent years as microbiome studies continue to develop. Given the links of the oral cavity with the digestive, respiratory and circulatory systems, the composition of the oral microbiome is relevant beyond just oral health, impacting systemic processes across the body. However, we still have a very limited understanding about intrinsic and extrinsic factors that shape the composition of the healthy oral microbiome. Here, we followed a citizen-science approach to assess the relative impact on the oral microbiome of selected biological, social, and lifestyle factors in 1648 Spanish individuals. We found that the oral microbiome changes across age, with middle ages showing a more homogeneous composition, and older ages showing more diverse microbiomes with increased representation of typically low abundance taxa. By measuring differences within and between groups of individuals sharing a given parameter, we were able to assess the relative impact of different factors in driving specific microbial compositions. Chronic health disorders present in the analyzed population were the most impactful factors, followed by smoking and the presence of yeasts in the oral cavity. Finally, we corroborate findings in the literature that relatives tend to have more similar oral microbiomes, and show for the first time a similar effect for classmates. Multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors jointly shape the oral microbiome. Comparative analysis of metabarcoding data from a large sample set allows us to disentangle the individual effects.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are thankful to all citizens that participated in the second edition of the “Saca La Lengua” project by contributing samples and sharing ideas (see more details here www.sacalalengua.org). In particular, for the work described here we are extremely thankful to all the students and teachers of the schools that we have visited, for their enthusiasm and questions, which helped to expand our hypotheses, to those responsible for civic centers, libraries, museums, bars, for giving us their spaces and giving us the possibility of organizing all events, and to the following national associations: Spanish Federation of Cystic Fibrosis (www.fibrosisquistica.org), Down España (www.sindromedown.net), and Federación de Asociaciones de Celíacos de España (www.celiacos.org); and local associations: Asociación Madrileña de Fibrosis Quística, Associació Catalana de Fibrosi Quística, Cocemfe Cantabria, Down Lleida, Down Bilbao, Down Vigo, Down Málaga, Associació Celíacs de Catalunya, Celíacos Euskadi, Federación de Asociaciones Celíacos Andalucía, and Asojum Murcia. Only with their effort are studies like this possible. The authors acknowledge the CRG Genomics Core Facility, CRG Bioinformatics Core Facility, CRG Biomolecular Screening and Protein Technologies Unit, CRG Communication and Public Relationships Department, and UCT ICTS High Performance Computing unit for providing access to the computing facilities. CRG authors acknowledge the Spanish Ministry for Economy, Industry and Competitiveness (MEIC) for the EMBL partnership, and Centro de Excelencia Severo Ochoa. The following reagents were obtained through BEI Resources, NIAID, NIH as part of the Human Microbiome Project: (1) Genomic DNA from Microbial Mock Community B (Even, Low Concentration), v5.1 L, for 16 S rRNA Gene Sequencing, HM-782D, and (2) Genomic DNA from Microbial Mock Community B (Staggered, Low Concentration), v5.2 L, for 16 S rRNA Gene Sequencing, HM-783D. The project was financed by the CRG through Genomics and Bioinformatics Core Facilities funds, and by the EduCaixa program through funds from the Fundación Bancaria “La Caixa”, with the participation of the Center for Research into Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), and the “Centre d’Excellència Severo Ochoa 2013–2017” program (SEV-2012-02-08) of the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Eppendorf, Illumina, and ThermoFisher sponsored the research by donating some materials and reagents. TG group acknowledges support from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation for grant PGC2018-099921-B-I00, cofounded by European Regional Development Fund (ERDF); from the CERCA Program / Generalitat de Catalunya; from the Catalan Research Agency (AGAUR) SGR423; from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under the grant agreement ERC-2016-724173; from Instituto de Salud Carlos III (INB Grant PT17/0009/0023 - ISCIII-SGEFI/ERDF).
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Research
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Informàtica::Aplicacions de la informàtica::Bioinformàtica
dc.subject.lcshMicrobiomes of humans, animals, plants, and the environment
dc.subject.lcshOral microbiology
dc.subject.otherNext-generation sequencing
dc.subject.otherMicrobiome
dc.subject.otherCitizen Science
dc.titleCitizen-science reveals changes in the oral microbiome in Spain through age and lifestyle factors
dc.typeArticle
dc.subject.lemacSimulació per ordinador
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41522-022-00279-y
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Reviewed
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41522-022-00279-y
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
dc.description.versionPostprint (published version)
dc.relation.projectidinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/724173/EU/Reticulate evolution: patterns and impacts of non-vertical inheritance in eukaryotic genomes./RETVOLUTION
local.citation.other38
local.citation.publicationNamenpj Biofilms and Microbiomes
local.citation.volume8
dc.relation.datasetThe fastq files for the paired forward and reverse reads of the 16 S rRNA sequencing of the 1648 oral rinse samples used for the analyses in this study (57,221 Mb) were uploaded to the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) with the BioProject accession number PRJNA667146 and can be found here: We also provide a table with the results of MALDI-TOF analyses of fungal composition (44 kb), which can be found here: https://github.com/Gabaldonlab/ngs_public/tree/master/SLL2. The unique and anonymized identifiers for each sample can be found at the beginning of each fastq file, and these correspond to the row names in the fungal composition tables.
dc.relation.datasetThe R code used to perform the statistical analyses can be found here: https://github.com/Gabaldonlab/ngs_public/tree/master/SLL2.
dc.description.authorship"Article signat per 15 autors/es: Jesse R. Willis, Ester Saus, Susana Iraola-Guzmán, Ewa Ksiezopolska, Luca Cozzuto, Luis A. Bejarano, Nuria Andreu-Somavilla, Miriam Alloza-Trabado, Andrea Blanco, Anna Puig-Sola, Elisabetta Broglio, Carlo Carolis, Julia Ponomarenko, Jochen Hecht & Toni Gabaldón"


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