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dc.contributor.authorMehringer, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorWerner, Lennart
dc.contributor.authorRiegler, Clemens
dc.contributor.authorDunschen, Frederik
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-29T07:59:07Z
dc.date.available2022-06-29T07:59:07Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-29
dc.identifier.citationMehringer, J. [et al.]. Suborbital autorotation landing demonstrator on REXUS 29. A: "4th Symposium on Space Educational Activities". Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 2022,
dc.identifier.isbn9788419184405
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/369264
dc.description.abstractCurrent developments in the aerospace industry point towards more frequent interplanetary travel in the future. However, the main focus of developments is on launcher technology, yet the descent of interplanetary probes is of high importance for the success of future missions. Additionally, to the present landing approaches using either a powered descent requiring fuel or a combination of different parachutes, a third method is investigated in this project. The chosen approach is called autorotation and is commonly used in helicopters. When a helicopter suffers a loss of power, it can still land and even choose its landing site without the utilization of an engine. Similar to parachutes, the presented technology can be applied to various atmospheric conditions by modification of rotor and control parameters. Moreover, a rotor in autorotation can provide directional control and thus the choice of a landing site, which is not feasible using a parachute. All these factors make autorotation an interesting option as an entry descent and landing (EDL) technology for interplanetary missions. Our project, Daedalus 2 implements the autorotation landing strategy as part of the REXUS student project campaign under DLR / ESA / SNSA supervision. Since 2018 we are developing the SpaceSeed Mk.2, a technology demonstrator that incorporates a rotor and all necessary technological means to perform an autorotation EDL maneuver from an apogee of 80 km. The mission concept is laid out within the presented paper. This includes the main challenges like miniaturization of the SpaceSeed v2 due to the size constraints of the REXUS rocket or the used sensors for height and position determination. The importance of a technology demonstrator tested on a sounding rocket to prove the feasibility of our presented system is laid out in our publication. Furthermore, the custom development of electrical, mechanical and software sub systems is discussed. Additionally, the planned mission profile will be explained, including flight phases and different activities conducted by the SpaceSeeds during flight. Moreover, the main differences and improvements to Daedalus 1 are being discussed
dc.format.extent6 p.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Aeronàutica i espai::Astronàutica::Enginyeria aeroespacial
dc.subject.lcshSpace vehicles
dc.subject.lcshParachutes
dc.subject.lcshRotors
dc.subject.otherReentry
dc.subject.otherLanding
dc.subject.otherAutorotation
dc.subject.otherParachutes
dc.subject.otherRotors
dc.titleSuborbital autorotation landing demonstrator on REXUS 29
dc.typeConference lecture
dc.subject.lemacVehicles espacials
dc.subject.lemacParacaigudes
dc.subject.lemacRotors
dc.identifier.doi10.5821/conference-9788419184405.039
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
local.citation.contributorSymposium on Space Educational Activities (SSAE)
local.citation.publicationName4th Symposium on Space Educational Activities


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