Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGanem, Carolina
dc.contributor.authorCoch Roura, Helena
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Departament de Construccions Arquitectòniques I
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-05T14:02:25Z
dc.date.available2014-05-05T14:02:25Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.citationGanem, C.; Coch, H. An Environmental review of wineries over the last centuries : from vernacular to high tech. A: International Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture. "PLEA2012 - 28th Conference, Opportunities, Limits & Needs Towards an environmentally responsible architecture". Lima: 2012.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/22818
dc.description.abstractFrom Egyptians and Phoenicians to our times, the process of making wine and wineries have gone a long way. Primitive wineries were caves found or made in the compact solid ground or special rooms constructed with high inertia materials such as rocks or earth blocks. These type of construction, with design variations, lasted until industrial revolution when new materials, mainly steel and glass sheets, were available for construction promoting bigger, faster and cheaper possibilities for industrial buildings. These changes affected interior temperatures and, as a consequence, mechanical energy consuming systems like serpentine pipes inside tanks controlled temperature during the fermentation process and air conditioned equipment were installed on oak breeding barrels rooms began to be mandatory in wineries. These last decades innovation in wineries materiality went from different types of metal sheets to petrol derived materials such as polymers. As thinner and lighter the building skin, the more important the amount of envelope in contact with the compact solid ground. This paper presents results in envelope characterization by energy flux exchanges and compactness of different constructive solutions for wineries responding to two different concepts: the high tech image (while traditional envelope still host wine production) and new skins (new industrial designs). The three main production stages (fermentation, breeding and storage) are discussed in the light of passive architecture.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Arquitectura::Tipologies d'edificis
dc.subject.lcshWine cellars
dc.subject.otherWineries
dc.subject.otherEnvelope
dc.subject.otherTraditional skins
dc.subject.otherNew skins
dc.titleAn Environmental review of wineries over the last centuries : from vernacular to high tech
dc.typeConference report
dc.subject.lemacCellers
dc.contributor.groupUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. AIEM - Arquitectura, energia i medi ambient
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.plea2012.pe/proceedings.php
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
drac.iddocument11492064
dc.description.versionPostprint (published version)
upcommons.citation.authorGanem, C.; Coch, H.
upcommons.citation.contributorInternational Conference on Passive and Low Energy Architecture
upcommons.citation.pubplaceLima
upcommons.citation.publishedtrue
upcommons.citation.publicationNamePLEA2012 - 28th Conference, Opportunities, Limits & Needs Towards an environmentally responsible architecture


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

All rights reserved. This work is protected by the corresponding intellectual and industrial property rights. Without prejudice to any existing legal exemptions, reproduction, distribution, public communication or transformation of this work are prohibited without permission of the copyright holder