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dc.contributor.authorGiménez Badia, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorVidela, Laura
dc.contributor.authorRomero Lafuente, Sergio
dc.contributor.authorBenejam, Bessy
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Departament d'Enginyeria de Sistemes, Automàtica i Informàtica Industrial
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-23T11:17:41Z
dc.date.available2019-04-23T11:17:41Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-15
dc.identifier.citationGiménez, S. [et al.]. Prevalence of sleep disorders in adults with down syndrome: A comparative study of self-reported, actigraphic, and polysomnographic findings. "Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine", 15 Octubre 2018, vol. 14, núm. 10, p. 1725.
dc.identifier.issn1550-9389
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/131820
dc.description.abstractStudy Objectives: Sleep problems are often undetected in adults with Down syndrome (DS). Our objective was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in adults with DS through self-reported and objective sleep measures. Methods: We performed a community-based cross-sectional study of 54 adults with DS not referred for sleep disorders. Two polysomnography (PSG) sleep studies were performed. Sleep quality was evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI); daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the risk for the sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) was identified using the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ). Participants’ sleep/wake pattern was assessed from sleep diaries and by wrist actigraphy. PSQI, ESS, and PSG measures were compared with 35 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched patients in the control groups. Results: In PSG measures, adults with DS showed lower sleep efficiency (69 ± 17.7 versus 81.6 ± 11; P < .001), less rapid eye movement sleep (9.4 ± 5.8 versus 19.4 ± 5.1; P < .001), a higher prevalence of OSA (78% versus 14%; P < .001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (23.5 ± 24.5 versus 3.8 ± 10.5; P < .001) than patients in the control group. In the DS group, the questionnaires (mean PSQI 3.7 ± 2.9; mean ESS 6.3 ± 4.5 and mean BQ 1 ± 0) did not reflect the sleep disturbances detected on the PSG. Actigraphy data recorded daytime sleep that was not self-reported (118.2 ± 104.2 minutes). Conclusions: Adults with DS show severe sleep disruption and a high prevalence of OSA, undetected by self-reported sleep measures. Actigraphy, PSG, and validated simplified devices for screening OSA should be routinely recommended for this population because treatment of sleep disorders can contribute to healthy aging.
dc.format.extent1 p.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Ciències de la salut
dc.titlePrevalence of sleep disorders in adults with down syndrome: A comparative study of self-reported, actigraphic, and polysomnographic findings
dc.typeArticle
dc.subject.lemacSon -- Aspectes sanitaris
dc.contributor.groupUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. BIOART - BIOsignal Analysis for Rehabilitation and Therapy
dc.identifier.doi10.5664/jcsm.7382
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://jcsm.aasm.org/ViewAbstract.aspx?pid=31405
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
local.identifier.drac23512083
dc.description.versionPostprint (published version)
local.citation.authorGiménez, S.; Videla, L.; Romero, S.; Benejam, B.
local.citation.publicationNameJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
local.citation.volume14
local.citation.number10
local.citation.startingPage1725
local.citation.endingPage1725


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