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dc.contributor.authorSadowska, Joanna Maria
dc.contributor.authorGuillem Martí, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorMontufar Jiménez, Edgar Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorEspañol Pons, Montserrat
dc.contributor.authorGinebra Molins, Maria Pau
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metal·lúrgica
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-07T17:26:11Z
dc.date.available2018-02-07T17:26:11Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-01
dc.identifier.citationSadowska, J., Guillem-Marti, J., Montufar, Edgar B., Español, M., Ginebra, M.P. Biomimetic versus sintered calcium phosphates: The in vitro behavior of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells. "Tissue engineering. Part A, tissue engineering", 1 Desembre 2017, vol. 23, núm. 23-24, p. 1297-1309.
dc.identifier.issn1937-3341
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/113924
dc.description.abstract© Copyright 2017, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.The fabrication of calcium phosphates using biomimetic routes, namely, precipitation processes at body temperature, results in distinct features compared to conventional sintered calcium phosphate ceramics, such as a high specific surface area (SSA) and micro-or nanometric crystal size. The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of these parameters on cell response, focusing on two bone cell types: rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and human osteoblastic cells (SaOS-2). Biomimetic calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) was obtained by a low temperature setting reaction, and a-Tricalcium phosphate (a-TCP) and ß-Tricalcium phosphate were subsequently obtained by sintering CDHA either at 1400°C or 1100°C. Sintered stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA) was also prepared using ceramic routes. The materials were characterized in terms of SSA, skeletal density, porosity, and pore size distribution. SaOS-2 cells and rMSCs were seeded either directly on the surfaces of the materials or on glass coverslips subsequently placed on top of the materials to expose the cells to the CaP-induced ionic changes in the culture medium, while avoiding any topography-related effects. CDHA produced higher ionic fluctuations in both cell culture media than sintered ceramics, with a strong decrease of calcium and a release of phosphate. Indirect contact cell cultures revealed that both cell types were sensitive to these ionic modifications, resulting in a decrease in proliferation rate, more marked for CDHA, this effect being more pronounced for rMSCs. In direct contact cultures, good cell adhesion was found on all materials, but, while cells were able to proliferate on the sintered calcium phosphates, cell number was significantly reduced with time on biomimetic CDHA, which was associated to a higher percentage of apoptotic cells. Direct contact of the cells with biomimetic CDHA resulted also in a higher alkaline phosphatase activity for both cell types compared to sintered CaPs, indicating a promotion of the osteoblastic phenotype.
dc.format.extent13 p.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Enginyeria biomèdica::Biomaterials
dc.subject.lcshBiomedical materials
dc.subject.otherBiomimetic hydroxyapatite
dc.subject.otherCalcium phosphate
dc.subject.otherMesenchymal stem cell
dc.subject.otherOsteoblast
dc.titleBiomimetic versus sintered calcium phosphates: The in vitro behavior of osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells
dc.typeArticle
dc.subject.lemacBiomaterials
dc.contributor.groupUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. BBT - Biomaterials, Biomecànica i Enginyeria de Teixits
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0406
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer Reviewed
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://online.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/ten.tea.2016.0406
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
drac.iddocument21683864
dc.description.versionPostprint (author's final draft)
upcommons.citation.authorSadowska, J., Guillem-Marti, J., Montufar, Edgar B., Español, M., Ginebra, M.P.
upcommons.citation.publishedtrue
upcommons.citation.publicationNameTissue engineering. Part A, tissue engineering
upcommons.citation.volume23
upcommons.citation.number23-24
upcommons.citation.startingPage1297
upcommons.citation.endingPage1309


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Except where otherwise noted, content on this work is licensed under a Creative Commons license: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain