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dc.contributor.authorBará Viñas, Salvador
dc.contributor.authorEscofet Soteras, Jaume
dc.contributor.otherUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. Departament d'Òptica i Optometria
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-30T13:30:44Z
dc.date.available2020-02-01T01:25:56Z
dc.date.issued2018-01-01
dc.identifier.citationBará, S., Escofet, J. On lamps, walls, and eyes: the spectral radiance field and the evaluation of light pollution indoors. "Journal of quantitative spectroscopy and radiative transfer", 1 Gener 2018, vol. 205, p. 267-277.
dc.identifier.issn0022-4073
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2117/109397
dc.description.abstractLight plays a key role in the regulation of different physiological processes, through several visual and non-visual retinal phototransduction channels whose basic features are being unveiled by recent research. The growing body of evidence on the significance of these effects has sparked a renewed interest in the determination of the light field at the entrance pupil of the eye in indoor spaces. Since photic interactions are strongly wavelength-dependent, a significant effort is being devoted to assess the relative merits of the spectra of the different types of light sources available for use at home and in the workplace. The spectral content of the light reaching the observer eyes in indoor spaces, however, does not depend exclusively on the sources: it is partially modulated by the spectral reflectance of the walls and surrounding surfaces, through the multiple reflections of the light beams along all possible paths from the source to the observer. This modulation can modify significantly the non-visual photic inputs that would be produced by the lamps alone, and opens the way for controlling-to a certain extent-the subject's exposure to different regions of the optical spectrum. In this work we evaluate the expected magnitude of this effect and we show that, for factorizable sources, the spectral modulation can be conveniently described in terms of a set of effective filter-like functions that provide useful insights for lighting design and light pollution assessment. The radiance field also provides a suitable bridge between indoor and outdoor light pollution studies.
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/
dc.subjectÀrees temàtiques de la UPC::Ciències de la visió::Òptica física::Llum
dc.subject.lcshLight pollution
dc.subject.lcshRadiometry
dc.subject.lcshPhotometry
dc.subject.otherArtificial light at night
dc.subject.otherLight field
dc.subject.otherLight pollution
dc.subject.otherPhotometry
dc.subject.otherRadiance field
dc.subject.otherRadiometry
dc.titleOn lamps, walls, and eyes: the spectral radiance field and the evaluation of light pollution indoors
dc.typeArticle
dc.subject.lemacContaminació lumínica
dc.subject.lemacRadiometria òptica
dc.subject.lemacFotometria
dc.contributor.groupUniversitat Politècnica de Catalunya. GOAPI - Grup d'Òptica Aplicada i Processament d'Imatge
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jqsrt.2017.09.022
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022407317305629?via%3Dihub
dc.rights.accessOpen Access
local.identifier.drac21577463
dc.description.versionPostprint (author's final draft)
local.citation.authorBará, S.; Escofet, J.
local.citation.publicationNameJournal of quantitative spectroscopy and radiative transfer


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain
Except where otherwise noted, content on this work is licensed under a Creative Commons license : Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Spain